2009 Archives

Some Holiday Coping Tips Gathered By RFS Team Member, Isabel Murphy

Gracie Cavnar
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The holidays are a wonderful time to unwind IsabelMurphy2.jpgwith family, enjoy life and indulge. If all of the rich food and drink has you feeling a bit bogged down, try some of these restorative tips put together by the team at Recipe for Success. You'll feel refreshed, detoxified and clear-headed--ready to take on 2010!

 

  1. Hydrate! Drink as much water as you can to flush any toxins out of your system. Start your day with a tall glass of warm water with lemon to get your 'juices' flowing. Drink throughout the day to prevent false hunger pangs.
  2. Move! Exercise a little every day and try to sweat at least 3-4 times a week. On days when you are not pushing yourself, take walks or do some stretches or yoga. Getting your heart rate up will move toxins out of your bloodstream and invigorate you.
  3. Sleep as much as you can--a tired body will be difficult to balance. Most people feel best after 7-8 hours of rest.
  4. Cut out the culprits: you don't have to give up alcohol, caffeine and sugar forever, but you might consider giving your body a bit of a break. Try cutting them out for a week or two or switch to healthier options like red wine, green tea or agave.
  5. Eat as many fresh fruits and vegetables as possible. Put fresh, organic produce at the center of every meal. Aim for at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
  6. Support local growers by shopping at farmer's markets: eating locally will give you access to some of the freshest food and will help support your community.
  7. Cut out 'white' foods as much as possible: eat only whole grains like quinoa, oats, millet, buckwheat and spelt.
  8. Eat when you are hungry and stop when you are 80 % full: this leaves the body critical room to digest and will make processing food easier. Also, wait until one meal is digested before eating the next--it takes about 4 hours for your body to fully process its food.
  9. Set realistic goals: if you are interested in losing weight, do it in specific increments. First aim for a pound or two, then a pound or two more. Don't set yourself up for frustration by resolving to lose 20 pounds. Make a timeframe, mark your calendar and stick to it.
  10. Volunteer! Getting out in the community will make you feel fulfilled and renewed. Come help us change the way children understand, appreciate and eat their food. Visit www.recipeforsuccess.org.

Get a Little Holiday Bling and benefit Recipe for Success

Gracie Cavnar
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Friday & Saturday December 4 & 5. Sheny Boutique is offering 10% off to RFS friends AND donating 10% of sales to the Foundation.

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Join Us for Dinner on December First

Gracie Cavnar
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A very special dinner will benefit Recipe for Success Foundation, and give guests a sneak peek at Canopy. $175 per person, read the entire invitation and book your tickets here.

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Read this charming account of her classroom experience by one of our fabulous volunteers.

Gracie Cavnar
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Great Coverage of RFS Programs on KPRC Channel 2

Gracie Cavnar
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This aired on the 5:00 evening news on Tuesday, November 17, 2009.
Click and watch

Food for Thought . . .or Just for Fun

Gracie Cavnar
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Recipe for Success and Houston Grand Opera Host a Day of Food Traditions and Stories at Discovery Green on November 21, 2009

HOUSTON, TEXAS -Recipe for Success Foundation (RFS) and Houston Grand Opera (HGO) are creating a community table for all of Houston to share traditions of food, culture, and stories in an event that is the culmination of Houston's Citizenship Week.  Food for Thought... or Just for Fun! is a free event on Grace Event Lawn at Discovery Green Park in Downtown Houston on Saturday, November 21, 2009 from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm.  
 
Family activities will include performances of Hansel and Gretel and How Nanita Learned to Make Flan by Houston Grand Opera's Opera to Go!, a demonstration of how to make flan by local celebrity chef and RFS Advisory Board Member, Peter Garcia of El Meson Restaurant, Good Enough to Eat! a holiday story collection by Recipe for Success Foundation, the collection of Historias by StoryCorps, and the creation of a dynamic table set for all Houston communities and families with drawings, poems and recipes of celebrations contributed by all who attend. As a special treat the school winners of the annual RFS Holiday Story Writing Contest for 4th grade students will read their work on NPR's StoryCorp and on the Food for Thought stage.
 
"Stories, children and food," says Gracie Cavnar, founder of Recipe for Success Foundation, "are the glue that binds us all together. The sharing of these stories over food form traditions that last a lifetime."  Sandra Bernhard, HGOco director adds, "Every culture has a storytelling tradition.  Houston Grand Opera helps provide unique ways to share our stories.  Gathered at the table, we will spend the day sharing customs about food, culture, and community through art, music and stories."  There is room for everyone at the table.


See entire release and schedule here:
http://campaign.constantcontact.com/render?v=001aYDP54lNfT--gGtrWUHGHb5O0ScNvWmTQTpJ2SIidA7aBlf6OGUvgtvfx0J571ZX1I149Cm56ixFw7OSqpWHo9h2fH7ZsP21RoZ9zHAhP-zIwvFe9syyGg%3D%3D

Industry pushes chocolate milk in schools - Yahoo! News

Gracie Cavnar
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The problem is that flavored milks are chock full of sweeteners and do nothing to redirect children's tastes for healthier foods.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091109/ap_on_bi_ge/us_got_chocolate_milk_3

Survey Reveals Parents Want Schools to Limit Access to Junk Food, Improve Physical Activity - News digest - Childhood Obesity newsroom - Childhood Obesity - RWJF

Gracie Cavnar
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Results of this Robert Wood Johnson survey tells policy makers what we parents have been saying all along.

http://www.rwjf.org/childhoodobesity/digest.jsp?id=25162

Tea & Temptations featuring Naeem Khan Spring Collection, November 19

Gracie Cavnar
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Book your tickets HERE for Tea & Temptations on November 19

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Time to Act on the Food Safety Bill Contact Your Senator Today--See How . . .

Gracie Cavnar
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Follow this link for directions for how to best communicate with your elected officials about this bill and make sure that small organic family farms are protected.

A primer in how to keep a beehive

Gracie Cavnar
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A Bountiful Buzz - Bees on the South Lawn

Gracie Cavnar
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http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/11/04/white-house-abuzz-with-first-honey/?ref=dining

A White House Chef Who Wears Two Hats - NYTimes.com

Gracie Cavnar
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Sam Kass is our advocate within the White House. Go Sam!

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/04/dining/04kass.html?_r=2

Chef Steve Haug is whipping up Healthy Pizzas to benefit RFS programs

Gracie Cavnar
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Report Shows Least Nutritious Cereals Are Heavily Marketed to Children - News digest from RWJF

Gracie Cavnar
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I have always said that powerful marketing forces are driving our current eating patterns and all good marketers know that it is less expensive to entice a custumer for life at 6 years old than at 60.  That's why the results of this RWJF study are not surprising.  Knowing how powerful marketing is, Recipe for Success constantly endeavors to secure good market position for healthy lifestyles by consistent reinforcement of our message: "Healthy food is fun."

http://www.rwjf.org/childhoodobesity/digest.jsp?id=24561

The Recipe for Success Foundation's Chefs in Schools™ is a unique approach to changing behaviors

Gracie Cavnar
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Excerpted from a story about the RFS Chefs in Schools program by Isabel Cowles
   For years, Houstonians have flocked to t'afia and Café Annie to enjoy the cuisine of award winning chefs Monica Pope and Robert Del Grande. Since 2006, many lucky 4th grade students have also enjoyed their culinary talents through the innovative, RFS Chefs in SchoolsTM. The initiative brings forty-seven high profile Houston chefs into 4th grade classrooms to teach the students healthy, delicious recipes that anyone can make. Chefs Advisory Board members share an essential element of human experience, according to Del Grande, "Cooking is a skill for life, and most kids today are not getting that at home."
When RFS founder, Gracie Cavnar first broached the subject with Monica Pope in the 1990s, she thought the idea to create cooking and gardening programs across HISD was idealistic--perhaps to a fault. "I thought, 'who would ever try to tackle food across Houston public schools?'" Pope explained, "You're dealing with thousands of kids who just want to eat McDonalds."
   But when Cavnar eventually showed her a binder full of detailed research on the value and necessity of a program tMonica Pope cooks.jpghat encourages healthy eating through cooking and gardening, Pope was convinced. She helped Cavnar recruit most of the other Chefs Advisory Board members and has taught in the program since its inception.  Recently, one of Pope's first students brought her family to t'afia for dinner and thanked Pope for her inspiration. "It was amazing to see a food barrier broken," Pope explained. "Experiencing a simple recipe can reach and transform kids' eating for the rest of their lives."  
   For Robert Del Grande, the program has been equally convivial.  The former college professor employs a unique approach to cooking with kids: "You've got to cajole them the way they cajole you," he explains. "I teach them that, if you like food, you should know how to cook it, and you should know how it grows." To pique the interest of a new class might mean starting with baked French fries and homemade ketchup, inspired by potatoes and tomatoes from the school garden.
   Del Grande weaves in lessons he sees on classroom blackboards during class, like using fractions, talking about food origins and geography, or cutting quesadillas into geometrical shapes. Most importantly, he likes to instill a sense of achievement. "It's important to show kids that they can cook, which is both liberating and empowering. They get freedom to make their own food choices and freedom from processed foods. Creating something edible leaves kids with a great sense of accomplishment--I can really see that."   by Isabel Cowles

Study Shows a Little Money Buys a Lot of Calories at City Corner Stores - RWJF

Gracie Cavnar
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Recipe for Success is teaching children about making healthier food choices, but often they find no choice in their home environment. It is critically important to offer alternatives in the places that children shop.  To compound this issue, often a corner convenience store is the only food source for an entire neighborhood, creating what is now being called a "food desert."  Encouraging participation in community gardens so people can grow their own fresh produce, along with providing a more diverse product lines in these bodegas will help provide healthier food options to more families.

http://www.rwjf.org/childhoodobesity/product.jsp?id=49609&c=EMC-ADV

Unlock the mysteries of handmade pizza with Arcodoro Chef Giancarlo Ferrara

Gracie Cavnar
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BOOK YOUR SPOT NOW! CLICK HERE TO RESERVE

USDA Pushes Farmers Markets As Fresh Alternative : NPR

Gracie Cavnar
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http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113484871

PLOTTING FOR GROWTH OF A PROGRAM THAT WORKS: Seed-to-Plate Nutrition Education™

Gracie Cavnar
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Recipe for Success Foundation has begun the fall term--year four on the ground in five Houston elementary schools, and growth is in the air. Time spent planting and stirring with over 10,000 kids has cooked up our comprehensive Seed-to-Plate Nutrition Education™ program that is adaptable to any school's capabilities.  Every element is infused with the Recipe for Success mantra that Healthy Food is Fun.  There is no question that we are making a difference, with parents and teachers reporting that children participating in our programs eat more fresh fruits and vegetables and demonstrate an awareness of good nutrition as well as a willingness to try new foods.

At our showcase schools, 3050 children are cooking with Chefs in Schools™ and gardening every month during the school day and waiting lists fill fast for spots in Eat This!™ & Kids Dig it!™ after school programs and summer camps. We are the largest sustained effort of this kind in the country.  Now we have turned our sights on the 40+ Houston area schools and districts that have waited patiently for us to expand.  We are exploring the right fit for them--one that will be sustainable and effective for the whole campus.  In the coming year, we also look forward to working with the City of Houston Health Department to implement Kids Dig It!™ and Eat This!™ After School and Summer Camps in their Community Centers, reaching a whole new population. Dozens of other centers and schools are making plans now to instigate various facets of our Seed-to-Plate Nutrition Education™ programs in the coming year and beyond.  Parents and educators are so enthusiastic about our results, that they feel confident in securing the funding required to launch their own RFS program.

In the meantime, RFS will continue to grant our core Seed-to-Plate Nutrition Education™ to Briscoe, Gross, NQ Henderson, Mac Gregor & Rodriguez, where we have already spent over $1million dollars to establish, test and develop the concept, but we are anxious to share with the nearly 100 folks who have contacted us from across the country.  So our new RFS Program Guide will be launched in July 2010 with a Summer Seminar for educators to be trained and certified.

We are deeply grateful for the ever-growing ranks of chefs and volunteers who have discovered the joys of lending a hand in our classrooms and gardens, and the support and collaboration of many others.  Numerous awards and recognition have come our way and the national spotlight has begun to seek us out as we model a highly effective approach to the epidemic of childhood obesity with tools that can travel anywhere.  We are heartened by the extra attention that first lady Michelle Obama has brought to the issue and we look forward to leading more and more children, parents, and educators down the path to healthy eating through fun interactive lessons in the kitchen and garden.

   Come join us anytime!

Gracie & the Recipe for Success Team

Time to PizzaParty! with Recipe for Success

Gracie Cavnar
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We have created a fun new way for you to help Recipe for Success Foundation raise funds to publish our Seed-to-Plate™Nutrition Education Program Guide.  Do a good deed while sharing the joys of the table with your family and friends.  Sign up today to host a Pizza Party! and stay tuned for party invitations from prominent Houston foodies.

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New York Times recently delved into the problems with lunch.

Gracie Cavnar
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The White House Victory Garden Works for All the Right Reasons

Gracie Cavnar
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Shop 'Til You Drop For Recipe for Success

Gracie Cavnar
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School is in Back Session and so is the Recipe for Success Team

Gracie Cavnar
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Our chefs and gardeners scrubbed and mulched and freshened their bulletin boards throughout August.  We presented cooking classes and garden tours during teacher in-service days and prepared to greet our latest group of 3050 students.

The children were delighted when they returned to their Recipe Gardens to dig huge sweet potatoes, with which they soon will be making muffins.  They met their chefs, got their new aprons, which of course had to be decorated and personalized, and learned the rules of the kitchen.  Then they skewered a colorful fruit kabob and mixed up fresh blueberry yogurt dipping sauce. 

For many of our volunteer Chefs, this is the fourth year in the classroom.  Monica Pope and Randy Evans at MacGregor, John Sheely at Rodriguez and Peter Garcia at Gross have been lending their expertise in the classroom every month since 2006.  This year twenty other of Houston's finest chefs are joining them.

Recipe for Success Welcomes volunteers and encourages you to come see for yourself how our tactics of making healthy eating fun are changing the way children eat for life.

Tell us what you would like to do to help.

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries from January 2009 listed from newest to oldest.

2008 is the previous archive.

2010 is the next archive.

Look in the archives to find all content.