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Sautéed Okra with Onions

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Shubhra Ramineni is a culinary instructor, busy mom of a veggie-loving girl and award-winning cookbook author of Entice with Spice, Easy Indian Recipes for Busy People and Healthy Indian Vegetarian Cooking, Easy Recipes for the Hurry Home Cook. Shubhra's no-fuss cooking style recreates authentic Indian flavors using easy techniques and fresh and easily available ingredients. Below, she's shared one of her favorites for you to try at home with your family...

shubhra okra.jpgOkra, known as "lady's fingers" in India, has a beautiful bright green color and looks wonderful on the table. This simple and easy way to cook okra will leave you with a delicious dish, without any of the okra "slime!" When buying fresh okra, avoid the flimsy, flexible ones. Look for crisp ones in which the tail end can be snapped off. Avoid the very hard okra that are over-ripe with brown seeds instead of the ideal white seeds. I also never cover okra when cooking because doing so will darken its color. Okra can be eaten with Indian flatbreads, such as Naan or Chapathi, and goes well when paired with lentil dishes. - Shubhra Ramineni

Sautéed Okra with Onions (Bhindi Pyaz)
Serves 4

Prep time: 5 minutes (15 minutes if using fresh whole okra)
Cook time: 35 minutes
Refrigerator life: 3 days
Freezer life: 1 month
Reheating method: Place the refrigerated or defrosted okra in a microwave and stir periodically. Or, place them in a skillet over medium-low heat and stir periodically until warmed.

Ingredients
1 lb (500 g) fresh okra or frozen, precut okra
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
Juice of ½ lime
1 small onion,  sliced into half moons
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
½ teaspoon ground red pepper (cayenne)
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions

  • If you're using frozen okra, do not defrost. If you're using fresh okra, wash the okra and pat dry with a kitchen towel. Trim the tip and head and discard. Slice each okra into ¼-inch (6-mm) pieces.
  • Pour the oil into a large nonstick skillet and place over medium heat. (Place over high heat if using frozen okra.) When the oil is heated, add the okra and lime juice. Sauté for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  • Reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the onion, turmeric, red pepper, salt, and black pepper. Stir to combine. Sauté until the okra is tender and onion becomes transparent, stirring frequently, about 30 minutes.
  • Enjoy now or let cool to room temperature and refrigerate or freeze for later!

Tip
Okra has a peculiar, slimly substance to it that is released when the okra is cut and washed. The first time I cooked okra, I washed it after I chopped it and had slime everywhere! That is why it is important to wash it and pat dry before chopping to reduce the release of the sticky material. If you're using frozen okra, it is best not to defrost it first, as it will become flimsy and release a lot of slimy substance. When okra is cooked with lime juice, any slime disappears as the okra cooks.

Recipe from Entice with Spice, Easy Indian Recipes for Busy People by Shubhra Ramineni. Learn more about Shubhra, her cookbooks and upcoming events and classes at enticewithspice.com.

Sautéed Okra with Onions

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Shubhra Ramineni is a culinary instructor, busy mom of a veggie-loving girl and award-winning cookbook author of Entice with Spice, Easy Indian Recipes for Busy People and Healthy Indian Vegetarian Cooking, Easy Recipes for the Hurry Home Cook. Shubhra's no-fuss cooking style recreates authentic Indian flavors using easy techniques and fresh and easily available ingredients. Below, she's shared one of her favorites for you to try at home with your family...

shubhra okra.jpgOkra, known as "lady's fingers" in India, has a beautiful bright green color and looks wonderful on the table. This simple and easy way to cook okra will leave you with a delicious dish, without any of the okra "slime!" When buying fresh okra, avoid the flimsy, flexible ones. Look for crisp ones in which the tail end can be snapped off. Avoid the very hard okra that are over-ripe with brown seeds instead of the ideal white seeds. I also never cover okra when cooking because doing so will darken its color. Okra can be eaten with Indian flatbreads, such as Naan or Chapathi, and goes well when paired with lentil dishes. - Shubhra Ramineni

Sautéed Okra with Onions (Bhindi Pyaz)
Serves 4

Prep time: 5 minutes (15 minutes if using fresh whole okra)
Cook time: 35 minutes
Refrigerator life: 3 days
Freezer life: 1 month
Reheating method: Place the refrigerated or defrosted okra in a microwave and stir periodically. Or, place them in a skillet over medium-low heat and stir periodically until warmed.

Ingredients
1 lb (500 g) fresh okra or frozen, precut okra
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
Juice of ½ lime
1 small onion,  sliced into half moons
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
½ teaspoon ground red pepper (cayenne)
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions

  • If you're using frozen okra, do not defrost. If you're using fresh okra, wash the okra and pat dry with a kitchen towel. Trim the tip and head and discard. Slice each okra into ¼-inch (6-mm) pieces.
  • Pour the oil into a large nonstick skillet and place over medium heat. (Place over high heat if using frozen okra.) When the oil is heated, add the okra and lime juice. Sauté for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  • Reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the onion, turmeric, red pepper, salt, and black pepper. Stir to combine. Sauté until the okra is tender and onion becomes transparent, stirring frequently, about 30 minutes.
  • Enjoy now or let cool to room temperature and refrigerate or freeze for later!

Tip
Okra has a peculiar, slimly substance to it that is released when the okra is cut and washed. The first time I cooked okra, I washed it after I chopped it and had slime everywhere! That is why it is important to wash it and pat dry before chopping to reduce the release of the sticky material. If you're using frozen okra, it is best not to defrost it first, as it will become flimsy and release a lot of slimy substance. When okra is cooked with lime juice, any slime disappears as the okra cooks.

Recipe from Entice with Spice, Easy Indian Recipes for Busy People by Shubhra Ramineni. Learn more about Shubhra, her cookbooks and upcoming events and classes at enticewithspice.com.

Sunchoke Cha Cha Cha!

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Bustling schedules and picky palettes can make the task of nourishing a family an uphill battle, so how do you get your brood to eat 30 different vegetables period, much less within one month?

Houston mom Amy Anton has stepped up for the challenge and is sharing her anxieties, discoveries and successes along the way.

rootveg.jpgHave you ever had a sunchoke? I hadn't even even heard of them until yesterday. And you probably don't care, but I cook A LOT. I read cooking magazines all of the time. But still, I had no idea what a sunchoke was. Until yesterday, that is.

I was wandering through the produce section at my local H-E-B, when I saw a basket marked "Sunchokes". Say what? "They are also known as Jerusalem Artichokes" Hmm, so obviously, they are some exotic version of an artichoke, I think... Not so! They are brown tubers, or root vegetables that look like a cross between ginger root and a small potato. Crazy!

I grabbed a bag of them and headed home, triumphant that I had a new vegetable for our Veggie Log. The story gets better, though, as we were having company for dinner. Perfect, I thought, they can all try sunchokes! Well, when I announced to my guests I had roasted sunchokes for them, you should have seen the look on their faces. I am sure they were thinking, she's making us try some weird food... my husband looked disgusted... and the seven boys looked at me like no way, no how. It is spring break, and I am NOT eating anything weird!

Determined, I cut the sunchokes into bite-size pieces, tossed them with olive oil and salt, and roasted them in the oven at 350 for 45 minutes. I snuck a bite of one before I served them, and WOW. Like a potato, but nutty, and not as starchy. And when I dished them out to everyone, you know what? They ALL loved them. They ate every last one! They asked for more! Boy, did I feel vindicated.

SO, if you are running out of new veggie ideas for your VegOut! Challenge (or your sanity), grab some sunchokes! They are in season right now, and I have seen them at Kroger, H-E-B, Central Market, and Whole Foods Market.

Kale Caesar Salad

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For the 2014 VegOut! Challenge, Amy Anton, Houston mom of three boys, shares a favorite recipe of her oldest son, which is a perfect method to check kale off of your family's Veggie Log.

AmyAnton-KaleCaesar.jpg

When I picked my twelve-year-old up from camp last year, the first thing he asked for was a Kale Caesar Salad. Wow, you might think, what an enlightened child, what a lucky mom. In some ways yes, in others, I just chuckle.

Kale is the super food of the year, on every menu in town, and, really yummy, but that is not why he loves it. He loves kale because it is a hearty leaf that can stand up to a serious Caesar dressing with a flurry of cheese, and still have fortitude. There's no limp, watery lettuce here. It's just stiff greens with briny anchovies, tart lemon, and the nutty goodness of parmesan. If that's what it takes for him to inhale an entire bunch of kale, so be it. There are a couple tricks we have learned along the way that make the salad the success that it is.

First, hold the rib of the kale in one hand and, with a sharp knife, just cut down the rib to remove the leaf. The rib is too bitter and hard to eat most of the time. Then chop chop chop all of the kale into fine pieces.

The recipe for the dressing is below, but we have a couple pointers. For one, mellowing the garlic in the lemon juice is a good thing, as it removes the raw garlic taste you would have otherwise. Also, don't be shy with the anchovies. Ashton has been known to slip in 6-8 anchovies! He likes strong flavors.

And last, massage the kale. Kids love to get their hands dirty, so this is fun for an idle child begging for dinner now. Massaging the dressing into the leaves with your hands really makes a difference. The kale needs to be persuaded into accepting the dressing, melding the flavors into one.

There are also endless possibilities for add-ins: tart cherries, avocado, pepitas, slivered almonds, thinly sliced radish... you name it.

Ashton's Caesar Salad

Ingredients

For dressing: 

1 clove garlic, minced

Juice of 1-2 lemons

Dash Worcestershire sauce

1 T Dijon mustard

2 anchovy filets

Yolk of 1 egg

1/2 C grape seed oil (or other mild flavored oil)

1/2 C grated Parmesan cheese

For salad:

1 head kale

Add-ins (optional)

Directions

  • Juice the lemon, mince the garlic and combine, letting them sit in a small mixing bowl while you chop the kale.
  • Whisk in the Worcestershire sauce, Dijon, anchovies, and egg yolk.
  • Slowly add the oil while whisking constantly.
  • Whisk in the the Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Pour desired amount of dressing over kale and massage it into the leaves.
  • Let dressed salad sit, covered, in the fridge for about 30 minutes to absorb the flavors.
  • Top with desired add-ins, if using, and serve! 

Bon appetit!

Coconut Polenta & Asian Veggies

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Polenta stir-fry.jpgThis recipe is a quick and easy way to take advantage of whatever vegetables you have on hand and infuse them with plenty of flavor. Cooking the polenta in a coconut broth also adds another dimension of aroma and flavor to this dish. Kids will love to help measure ingredients and practice their knife skills by chopping up the veggies.

Coconut Polenta with Asian Vegetables

From the Recipe For Success Chefs Advisory Board
Serves 4-6

Polenta stir-fry-Mis en place.jpg

 Ingredients

1 (14 ounce) can of light coconut milk
2 ½ cups low-sodium vegetable or chicken stock, reserve one ½ cup for sauce
1 cup polenta (dry, quick cooking type)
olive oil
1 onion, diced
1 tablespoon garlic, minced
2-3 cups of vegetables (Green beans, broccoli, bell pepper, mushrooms, etc.)
3-5 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce, to taste
3-5 tablespoons sweet chili sauce (in Asian section of store)
1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced
Siracha, to taste
Scallions, green portion sliced thin for garnish

Directions

  • Bring coconut milk and 1 ½ cups of broth to a gentle boil, and reduce to a simmer.
  • Slowly whisk in the polenta and cook for 5 minutes.  If polenta becomes too thick, just add more broth.  Add salt and pepper to taste.
  • Heat oil in a sauté pan over med-high heat.  Sauté onions for 3 to 4 minutes, then add garlic and continue to cook for 1 minute. 
  • Add heartier vegetables, like broccoli and greenbeans and cook for 3 to 5 minutes. 
  • Add ½ cup of broth, soy sauce, sweet chili, ginger and siracha. 
  • Finally add delicate vegetables like mushrooms or greens and continue cooking for 3-5 minutes.  Vegetables should be bright and al dente.
  • For each serving, spoon a scoop of polenta into a shallow soup bowl.
  • Top polenta with sauted vegetables and sauce and garnish with scallions.

Notes

  • For additional protein, try adding shrimp, fish, scallops, or tofu to your stir-fry.
  • Add pureed sweet potato to the polenta for a flavor and nutritional boost!

 Ideas for leftovers

  • Make polenta cakes-mold polenta into patties and brown each side in pan with a bit of oil.
  • Wrap sauteed vegetables in a tortilla or stuff in a pita pocket for lunch.

Arugula, Berry and Jicama Salad

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Jicama-Arugala salad.jpg The crunchy jicama, tart apple, sweet berries and peppery bite of arugula in this salad are a perfect way to celebrate summer produce at its peak.  Blackberries are splendid in salads because they're sturdy enough to stand up to tossing and substantial enough to be speared with a fork, but other berries would be delicious as well.  Jicama is a round, tan root vegetable that can be found in the produce section of the supermarket.  If you can't find it, just ask!  In a pinch, you can use seeded cucumber in place of jicama.  Arugula purchased at a local farmers market will be very peppery and delicious! 

Arugula, Jicama, and Apple Salad

From the RFS Chefs Advisory Board

Serves 4

 

Ingredients

For dressing:

4 teaspoons lime juice

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons champagne or rice wine vinegar

2 teaspoons agave nectar or honey

1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated (or 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger)

For salad:

2 cups arugula

1 cup blackberries, blueberries or raspberries

1 cup jicama, peeled and cut into thin matchsticks (about ½ jicama)

1 cup granny smith apple, cut into thin matchsticks

 

Directions

  • Add lime juice, oil, vinegar, agave nectar, and ginger in a bowl, and whisk vigorously to combine and emulsify.
  • Combine arugula, blackberries, jicama, and apple in separate bowl.
  • Toss with dressing, and serve immediately. Bon appetit!

 

Notes

  • Kid helper tip: Encourage the help of kids in the kitchen by allowing them to measure and pour dressing ingredients into a jar, instead of a bowl, then twist on the lid and let them shake vigorously to mix the dressing.
  • For a creamier dressing, add 2 tablespoons of Greek yogurt in the first step.
  • To prepare the salad ahead of time, do not dress! Store the salad ingredients in an airtight container for up to 3 days and store the dressing separately in a sealed container.
  • Make extra dressing and store in the refrigerator for a quick salad later!

Artichoke Bruschetta

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Artichoke bruschetta.jpgReady or not, summer is officially here. To embrace (or distract from) those warmer temps, we suggest leaning in and gearing up for summer parties! Whether you're hosting a backyard barbecue for the whole block or simply entertaining company who have dropped by, this quick and tasty appetizer is a crowd-pleaser and a no-brainer. Perfect to welcome the summer season, it takes advantage of the fresh summer bounty and requires only a quick pop in the oven so you can keep that kitchen cool as an... artichoke? Well, you get the idea. Bon appétit!

Artichoke Bruschetta on Parmesan Crostini

From the RFS Chef Team

Yields about 20-25 crostinis 

Artichoke heart bruschetta-Ingredients.jpg

Ingredients

For the topping:

1 (16 ounce) can artichoke hearts, drained and chopped

3-5 tomatoes, diced

½ white onion, diced

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

½ tablespoons balsamic vinegar 

½ cup parsley, chopped finely

salt and pepper

For the crostini:

1 French baguette

2 tablespoons olive oil

¼ cup Parmesan cheese, grated

 

Directions

  • Turn broiler on low.
  • Combine chopped artichoke hearts, tomatoes and onions.  
  • Add olive oil, balsamic vinegar, parsley and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Slice baguette ¼ - ½ inch thick on a bias. Brush both sides with olive oil and place on a baking sheet.  Broil on low one side of the crostini; then flip, top with Parmesan and broil cheese until golden.
  • Top with artichoke bruschetta and enjoy!

 

Notes

  • Artichoke topping may be made ahead of time.
  • Use extra topping to make an easy artichoke pasta or pizza!
  • Add to your favorite lettuce for a delicious salad.

Pasta Primavera

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Pasta Primavera.jpg Primavera means spring in Italian and this dish was first created to celebrate young spring vegetables, but you can mix and match the veggies to make it with the best that any season has to offer.  Here it is with a little bit of everything. (Recipe from Eat It! Food Adventures with Marco Polo.)

Serves 8 as entrée

INGREDIENTS
½ package fettuccini-style dried noodles, cooked according to package directions                                  
¼ cup olive oil, divided
2 carrots, minced
2 ribs celery, minced
1 small red onion, minced
¼ teaspoon salt
2 cloves garlic, minced
5 stalks parsley minced
1 green onion, sliced thin
1 red bell pepper, julienne
½ bunch asparagus, tough stalks removed and tops cut into 1 inch pieces
1 cup broccoli flowers, steamed for 3-4 minutes until bright green
½ cup peas (fresh or frozen)
2 ounces fresh spinach leaves, torn into bite-sized pieces                
4-6 basil leaves, chiffonade
1/8 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Step One: Make a Sofrito
    1.    Collect and measure all of your ingredients to create a mise en place.
    2.    Heat a large sauté pan to medium high heat and add ½ the olive oil; let heat up for 1 - 2 minutes.
    3.    Add minced carrots to the pan and sauté for 2 minutes.
    4.    Add minced celery and continue cooking 2 minutes.
    5.    Stir in the minced onion and cook until it starts to seem clear (about 5 minutes.)
    6.    Add salt.
    7.    Add the minced garlic and continue cooking for about 2 minutes, or until they release their wonderful aroma (smell.)
    8.    Stir in the minced parsley.
You have just created an Italian style sofrito, which if you stopped now, could be used as a great flavor base for soups, stews, and sauces.
Step Two: Layer the Flavor
    1.    Gently add the green onion, bell pepper, asparagus, and broccoli and cook for 3-4 minutes until all the veggies turn even brighter.
    2.    Stir in the fresh or frozen peas and spinach and remove pan from heat.
    3.    Add the pasta and the rest of the olive oil, and toss to coat.
Step Three: Serve it up
    1.    Divide into shallow soup bowls.
    2.    Garnish with basil leaves, grated Parmesan cheese and a sprinkling of cracked pepper.
    3.    Serve immediately.

Eggplant Parmesan!

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Eggplant parm 2.JPGFor an easy delicious vegetarian meal that pleases even the most ravenous appetite, try this all time favorite and get everyone in on the act.  Kids love to salt and rinse the eggplant and to help bread it.  Add a tossed seasonal salad to start and finish with sliced fruit for dessert.

Eggplant Parmesan Recipe from the RFS Team Chefs Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

1 onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
16 oz. can diced tomatoes or one pound fresh tomatoes diced
16 oz. can tomato sauce
1 teaspoon dried oregano
salt and pepper to taste
2 teaspoons of balsamic vinegar
1 bunch kale leaves, spine removed and chopped
½ bunch fresh basil, stems removed and chopped
1 large or 2 small fresh eggplantsEggplant parm Mis.JPG
2 eggs
½ cups milk
2 cups breadcrumbs
1 cups flour
pepper to taste
1 cups Parmesan cheese (grated)

Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Make the Sauce:

  • Sauté onions and garlic in olive oil, until tender. 
  • Add diced tomatoes and tomato sauce, season with oregano, salt, pepper, and balsamic vinegar.  Simmer for 10-15 min.
  • Add chopped kale and cook for 2 min (until greens are bright green).
  • Stir in chopped basil and remove from heat.

 Prepare the Eggplant:

  • Slice eggplant crossways into ½ inch rounds. 
  • Generously salt both sides of each slice.   
  • Lay slices on a paper towel and cover with another paper towel and let rest for 15 minutes--this is to draw out the bitterness of the eggplant. 
  • Wash the salt off of slices under running water and pat dry.
  • Whisk together eggs and milk in a medium bowl
  • Put flour on a flat plate with added pepper
  • Put breadcrumbs on another flat plate
  • To bread the eggplant slices:  One by one, using tongs, dredge the slices in the flour to lightly cover both sides, then dip into egg/milk mix to fully coat each slice, and then dredge slices in breadcrumbs bread to fully coat both sides. 
  • Lay breaded eggplant slices flat a large shallow baking dish and place in hot oven
  • Bake for 15-20 min, or until tender
  • Carefully remove hot pan from oven
  • Top eggplant slices with sauce and grated Parmesan
  • Return to oven for another 7-9 min, and then turn heat to low broil
  • Cook until cheese is golden and bubbly.

 Enjoy!
This recipe was developed by the Recipe for Success Chefs
© 2013 Recipe for Success Foundation

Involve the kids:

  • Breading is a fun kitchen activity for kids.
  • Make double the amount of tomato sauce and freeze for another night.  Defrost and toss with pasta and vegetables.

Use the leftovers

  • Make Eggplant Parmesan sandwich topped with Arugula and a slice of fresh mozzarella.
  • Cut up leftovers and toss with linguine & olive oil.  Add fresh mozzarella and basil.
  • Top with a fried egg for an Italian breakfast

The Lunchbox Gets a Makeover

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bentobox.jpg     How do you define school supplies?
     Of course there are the ubiquitous backpacks, pencils, crayons, rulers, scissors and all the other quintessential necessities for the classroom.
     But what if we expand the accepted definition of "school supplies" to include what children tote around in their lunch boxes? The lunchroom is just as much of an educational setting as the classroom and the lunchbox is a powerful tool that can either help or hinder your little one's lunchtime experience.
     How do you achieve optimal lunchbox success? Here a few tips to help you get started.
·      Choose brightly colored fruits and veggies to create a visually pleasing plate
·      Make sure all food is kid-friendly size so it is easy and fun to eat
·      It's not all about the food; packaging can be just as important! Check out the new bento box lunchboxes for kids (and adults); brightly colored and differing in sizes so as to help with portion control
·      Step out of the box when it comes to the ever-present sandwich; use cookie cutters for fun shapes or just scratch the sandwich entirely and try meat and cheese roll ups!
·      Have your children help you pack the lunchbox; the more your children participate in food preparation, the more likely they will be to eat what is in their lunchbox
     Your colorful, creative and (hopefully) collaborative lunchbox will make your child the star of the lunchroom. Gone are the days of trading mushy bananas for a shrink-wrapped twinkie.
"The kids are loving this program!  I know they are cooking the recipes at home because they come back to school the next day and tell me about it!!" says a 5th grade teacher at EA Jones Elementary
     Recipe for Success' integrative Seed-to-Plate Nutrition EducationÔ teaches kid-friendly recipes, easily adapted for the dinner plate or the lunch box.
     Make your child's lunchbox "lunchroom ready" with the following Recipe for Success recipe.
A Recipe for Success:  Paprika Cauliflower Pita Pockets
Serves 4
Ingredients:
1       head fresh cauliflower (2 pounds), cut into bite-size florets
3       tablespoons olive oil
2       tablespoons sweet Hungarian paprika
½       teaspoon ground black pepper
½       teaspoon fine sea salt
1       medium red onion, diced to = 1 cup
1       clove garlic, minced
½       cup low-sodium vegetable broth
2       tablespoons lemon juice
4       pita bread rounds, halved and warmed
Process:
Assemble and measure all your ingredients to create a mise en place
1.    Using a saucepan with steamer insert set over high heat, add cauliflower, cover and steam for 7 to 9 minutes, or until fork tender.
2.     Remove cauliflower to a colander or strainer and set aside to drain.
3.    While cauliflower is cooking, set a non-stick skillet over medium low heat.
4.    Add olive oil, paprika, pepper, and salt to the skillet and sauté, stirring constantly for 2 minutes, or until fragrant.
5.     Add onion and garlic, to the skillet and sauté 2 minutes longer.
6.    Stir in cooked cauliflower and broth to the skillet, and simmer 3 minutes.
7.    Remove skillet from heat, and stir in lemon juice.
8.    Allow to cool.
Serve inside pita halves for a nutritious lunch.
Get Adventurous!
·      Try adding fresh tomatoes, chopped black olives, and some low-fat Parmesan cheese to the stuffed pita pockets.
·      Experiment with using different seasonal vegetables in place of cauliflower.
·     Add any leftover filling to a salad.  It's just as good cold!

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the What's For Dinner? category.

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